“…how did it happen that scientists from the 1940s understood exactly where they were heading? They had applied after all ideas from XXI century physics… What arguments did they lay down (before the launch of work) that caused them to win the race for funds…? …The unusualness of all this is summed up by the fact, that descriptions of mercuric propulsion had appeared as long ago as in...
foo fighter
A continuation of this article: https://www.maier-files.com/the-ww-ii-german-flying-saucers/ Article by William Lyne The purported Schauberger ships (the only information we really have are photos of models built by Felix Schauberger), purportedly built in Czechoslovakia, were supposedly designed to use an “implosion turbine” to generate the power to drive an ‘air-blower’ intended to propel the ship. As such, it was little more than a (flying?) air conditioning vent, with an unusual...
William Lyne on the German Flying Saucers (part One): In this short summary, I will avoid suspected misinformation, or material which is unrealistically speculative. There were purportedly several inventors working in Nazi Germany on various types of flying saucers, not all of which were electro-propulsive in concept, meant to operate on rocket, jet, turbojet, or prop-driven reactions of the aerodynamic type. CIA-concocted garbage All the video or literary...
By 1945 World War II had ended, but in Lithuania the war against the Soviet Union had only just begun. One of the bloodiest battles of the Lithuanian armed resistance, the battle of Kalniškės, was fought only days after “VE day”. Lithuanian farmers, school teachers, university professors, university and high school students, and a small number of remaining non-commissioned officers and lower ranking officers from independent Lithuania’s military,...
Without doubt, the most bizarre and controversial event in the History of World War II was the parachute jump by Deputy Führer Rudolf Hess into Scotland on May 10, 1941. Hess was supposedly on a peace mission to negotiate a peace between England and Germany. Hess was allegedly on his way to see the Duke of Hamilton in Scotland, with whom he believed he could negotiate a peace....
Aleister Crowley is, few would argue, the father of modern occultism, neopaganism, and New Age spirituality. Today’s Thelemites (avowed followers of Crowley and his spiritual doctrine of Thelema) far outnumber the small cadre he recruited in his lifetime. His motto “Do What Thou Wilt” has had a subtle and profound influence on modern culture. While some still fear and loathe him, Aleister Crowley inspires fascination, even admiration, in...
Marta Hillers’s only consolation was that she had refused to put her name on the extraordinary manuscript in which she had so meticulously recounted the Soviet conquest of Berlin during the cold spring of 1945. It had been a time when her life—like that of tens of thousands of other Berlin women and girls—had become a nightmare of fear, hunger, and rape. Published for the first time in...
Dublin Brigade
With the Dublin Brigade tells the story of one man’s role in the Irish War of Independence. First published in 1929, the author, Charles Dalton, was but a young man, only twenty-six years old, when he decided to write about his experiences during the conflict that resulted in Ireland winning independence, although not full independence, from Great Britain. James Francis Dalton Dalton was born in January 1903 to...
Storm of Steel (In Stahlgewittern is the original title) is one of the great books of World War I, if not the greatest. All sorts of trustworthy and unlikely people – and trustworthy often precisely because unlikely: cosmopolites, left-wingers, non-combatants – have stepped up to express their admiration, often in suitably embarrassed or bemused fashion: Böll and Borges, Enzensberger and Brecht, Gide and Moravia. In 1942, Gide wrote...
portrait Ernst Jünger
Memories bear traits of an inverse causality. The world, as an effect, resembles a tree with a thousand branches, but as memory it leads downwards into the tangled network of the roots. When I confront memories, it often seems like gathering a bundle of seaweed from the ocean—the tiny bit visible from afar, when slowly dragged up into the light, reveals an extensive system of filaments. —Ernst Jünger,...
The fundamental principle underlying all justifications of war, from the point of view of human personality, is ‘heroism’. War, it is said, offers man the opportunity to awaken the hero who sleeps within him. War breaks the routine of comfortable life; by means of its severe ordeals, it offers a transfiguring knowledge of life, life according to death. The moment the individual succeeds in living as a hero,...
walingsham
War is older than History. Battle axes of polished stone found in late Neolithic culture, and the arms of war have appeared in every society since, escalating from cavemen’s weapons of personal destruction to nations’ weapons of mass destruction. Vicious fights evolved into nation-versus-nation and culture-versus-culture wars. Covered within every war is a secret war whose actions may never be chronicled. Secret wars Because of the lack of...