Sophists
TIDBITS The sophists were skeptics who doubted the possibility of attaining true knowledge of anything. They emphasized the practical application of rhetoric in civic and political life. Some claimed that they could teach both a thing and its opposite, simultaneously arguing both thesis and antithesis. One of the founders of sophism was Gorgias a Sicilian philosopher, orator, and rhetorician who settled in Athens where over his long life of 108...
With unflinching gaze and uncompromising intensity Julius Evola analyzes the spiritual and cultural malaise at the heart of Western civilization and all that passes for progress in the modern world. As a gadfly, Evola spares no one and nothing in his survey of what we have lost and where we are headed. At turns prophetic and provocative, Revolt against the Modern World outlines a profound metaphysics of history and demonstrates...
The Order of the Knights Templar was dissolved by Pope Clement V at the beginning of the fourteenth century. From its humble beginnings, this society of warrior-monks grew into an extraordinary military and financial power. Eventually, a king wanted to get rid of this order, which had become a state within a state. He selected the appropriate inquisitors, who gathered random rumors about the order and composed a terrible mosaic: depraved crimes, unmentionable heresies, corruption, and a dash of homosexuality […]...
Edmund Burke was born in Dublin on 12 January 1729, the son of a Protestant solicitor and a Catholic mother. He died on 9 July 1797. After becoming elected to the House of Commons, Burke was expected to take the oath of Allegiance and abjuration, the oath of supremacy, and declare against transubstantiation: no ‘Catholic’ has been known to have done so in the eighteenth century. Despite the fact that...
Righteous Judges Rechtvaardige Rechters
The iconography of The Ghent Altarpiece has since a long time fascinated  researchers. When it was finished in 1432, the work of art became instantly the most famous in Europe. It was the first real oil painting. Oil had been utilized to tie shades to artistic creations since the Middle Ages, however Jan van Eyck was the first to exhibit the genuine capability of oils, which permit far greater subtlety...
Templar knight medieval illustration
Like that staple opening of so many films, it began with a funeral. On 12 October 1307, James of Molay, Master of the Temple, was one of a number of distinguished personages who held the cords of the pall spread over the coffin of Catherine of Courtenay, wife of Charles of Valois, brother of King Philip the fair of france, during her funeral ceremony in the cathedral of notre-Dame in Paris. Molay’s role was an entirely appropriate reflection of his […]...
conspiracy eye
FDR once said “In politics, nothing happens by accident. If it happens, you can bet it was planned that way.” He was in a good position to know. We believe that many of the major world events that are shaping our destinies occur because somebody or somebodies have planned them that way. If we were merely dealing with the law of avenges, half of the events affecting our nation’s well-being...
Marta Hillers’s only consolation was that she had refused to put her name on the extraordinary manuscript in which she had so meticulously recounted the Soviet conquest of Berlin during the cold spring of 1945. It had been a time when her life—like that of tens of thousands of other Berlin women and girls—had become a nightmare of fear, hunger, and rape. Published for the first time in German in...
Red cross
In the midst of the thirteenth century, outlaw gangs and mercenaries roamed the lawless region between the Rhine and the Weser rivers in Westphalia, Germany. The free men and commoners created the Chivalrous Order of the Holy V(F)ehm. It was a secret vigilante society to guard themselves from those bandits and outlaws. At first, the resistance group had the approval of both the church and the Holy Roman emperor, however as time went by the Holy Vehm grew to become […]...
The United Nations
The history of how the United Nations was created is a classic case of diplomacy by deception. The United Nations is the successor to the defunct League of Nations, the first attempt to set up a One World Government in the wake of the Paris Peace Conference which gave birth to the Treaty of Versailles. The Threat of the United Nations. The peace conference opened at Versailles, France on January...
trenches WW1
Albert Jay Nock wrote one of the first American books of World War 1 Revisionism, revising the received story of why World War 1 began. Originally published in 1922 by B. W. Huebsch, Inc. The Myth of a Guilty Nation was Albert Jay Nock’s first great antiwar book, a cause he backed his entire life. The book came out in 1922 and has been in very low circulation ever since....
Mani
The dualistic religious system of Mani is a combination of Gnostic Christianity, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, and various other elements, with a basic doctrine of a conflict between light and dark, matter being regarded as dark, evil and imperfect. The physical world, nature and life are considered as the realm of the dark creator or the true devil and should be resisted. “Manichean” has come to describe a tendency to see things in overly simple terms as wholly evil or wholly good, […]...
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