Templar cross and Cathar Cross
The French historian Raimonde Reznikov’s book ‘Cathares et Templiers’ can be something of a scholar’s antidote to the wilder extremes of conspiracy mongering. As reported by Reznikov, besides the evident link that Templars and Cathars were suppressed by shared conspiracy between state and church, the solely genuine sympathetic link originated from the imaginations of eighteenth-century Freemasons. She writes: The Templar mythology, fabricated in the 18th century in the bosom of German lodges by the vanity...
Albruna Gudrun
Like in all ancient Norse myths codes and messages are hidden within. Mainstream scholars like us to believe that these myths are just simple stories to entertain or to describe natural phenomena our dumb forefathers were too ignorant to understand. But these tales are like riddles and intellectual challenges to be solved and contain real wisdom and knowledge. Ms. Jessie L. Weston, after more than thirty years of study, wrote a little book entitled From...
Faust
The secret teachings of Goethe. That Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832), Germany’s greatest poet, had an interest in the occult and alchemy is clear from Faust. Based on an historical character, the original Faust legend goes back to medieval times and prior to Goethe‘s there were earlier dramatic renditions of the tale, notably Christopher Marlowe’s. Yet it is to Goethe’s Faust (Part I 1808; Part II 1833) that most of us turn when we think...
heresy
Heretic Middle English: from Old French heretique, via ecclesiastical Latin from Greek hairetikos ‘able to choose’ (in ecclesiastical Greek, ‘heretical’), from haireomai ‘choose’. In the Encyclopaedia Britannica one can read:“The word heresy is derived from the Greek hairesis which originally meant an act of choosing, and so came to signify a set of philosophical opinions or the school professing them. As so used the term was neutral, but once appropriated by Christianity it began to...
Rolf Diettrich and Gudrun
The attentive reader of the first episodes of Maier files will have noticed that the tale once told by Rolf Dietrich and the history of Otto Maier are filled with powerful themes and images that might provide a clue to the real hidden mystery, among them: the Rose Trail (Troj de Reses), web of woven silk, the knights in the line of Dietrich von Bern, the enchanted windmill, fiancée of the Month of May, the...
Bormann Martin
He plays a small role in the story about the disappearance of Otto Maier and Maier files, Martin Bormann. In May 1941 Martin Bormann was made Party Chancellor of the National Socialist Party, a position he utilized to become the Third Reich’s principal bureaucrat. He was also Hitler’s right-hand man, his personal secretary and his bookkeeper, and stood with the Führer until the end. The last incontestable sighting of Bormann was in the early hours...
Eldridge
On 13 January 1955 Morris K. Jessup, writer of The Case for the UFO (1955), obtained a letter from a gentleman identifying himself as Carlos Allende. This informed Jessup of a top-secret naval project from the Second World War: the Philadelphia Experiment. So, Allende reported that the US Navy had tried to make warships undetectable. And it was successful in that endeavor on October 28, 1943. On that date the escort destroyer USS Eldridge disappeared from its berth at...
Haunebu picture taken 1949
At the time of the impressive flying-saucer wave after the Second World War, there seemed to be just one single band of people more researching for UFOs than UFOlogists: the US Air Force. Perfectly logical there, given that the men in blue could very well be the front line against ETs or even, if the saucers were shown to be a vile Commie new technology, against the USSR. Initially the Air Force gathered flying-saucer reports...